About

Regine Ehleiter is a curator, writer and PhD candidate in Art History with a research focus on exhibition history, artists’ publications, Conceptualism and contemporary photography. She is currently working as a lecturer at the Academy of Visual Arts (Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst) in Leipzig.

Regine studied Cultural Studies, Art History and Journalism in Leipzig and London. In 2006, she co-founded the non-profit space D21 Kunstraum. After completing her M.A. in 2011, she joined the curatorial team of Staatliche Kunsthalle Baden-Baden. Here, she initiated a platform with changing displays of books by small international publishers (Publishers’ Corner), organised solo exhibitions by Böhler & Orendt, Rachel Sussman and Triin Tamm, and, together with Johan Holten, co-curated a major group exhibition on contemporary wall works (Auf Zeit, 2013). Following that, she worked for the 6th f/stop Festival for Contemporary Photography in Leipzig. In 2016, she was awarded a Curatorial Fellowship of the state of Rhineland Palatinate as part of which she curated the exhibition What’s Unfolding (2017) at Arp Museum Bahnhof Rolandseck.

Parallel to her curatorial work, Regine is completing a PhD on publications as sites of exhibition in the 1960s, supervised by Prof. Dr. Beatrice von Bismarck at the Academy of Visual Arts in Leipzig (external examiner: Prof. Dr. Ursula Frohne). In 2015, she was awarded a doctoral grant by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), which allowed her to do extensive archival research at MoMA in New York and the Archives of American Art in DC. From March to May 2016, she stayed at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles as a guest researcher, and, in 2018/2019, she was a Predoctoral Visiting Scholar at the Courtauld Institute of Art in London.

Regine has taught Art History classes on B.A. and M.A. level at Burg Giebichenstein in Halle (WS 2020), at the University of Hildesheim (WS 2019/2020, SS 2020), in the Curatorial Studies program at Goethe Universität/Städelschule Frankfurt (WS 2017/18), and in the Cultural Studies department at the University of Leipzig (WS 2014/15). She regularly contributes to art magazines and exhibition catalogues.

https://hgb-leipzig.academia.edu/RegineEhleiter

https://www.instagram.com/reginee/
https://www.pinterest.de/regineehleiter/

  • a collaboration w James White, a climate scientist at the University of Colorado, considers the catastrophic effects of climate change in three riparian zones: floods and hurricanes along the lower Mississippi; increasing water levels in the Ganges and rising seas in and around Bangladesh; and desertification along the Nile and throughout Darfur. Digital prints, based in part on images taken from satellite maps together with drawings and text by Rahmani, bespeak of the calamities…
  • "Based on the findings of a conservation biologist at the University of Vienna, the video tracks the ascent of three species of white and purple flowers up an alpine mountain, which becomes steadily enclosed by a virtual greenhouse that generates ever-rising temperatures. By the end of the video, the purple flowers have reached the summit and then simply disappear, leaving only a few patches of white flowers to continue their ascent into the unknown." (Finis Dunaway)
  • "Based on the findings of a conservation biologist at the University of Vienna, the video tracks the ascent of three species of white and purple flowers up an alpine mountain, which becomes steadily enclosed by a virtual greenhouse that generates ever-rising temperatures. By the end of the video, the purple flowers have reached the summit and then simply disappear, leaving only a few patches of white flowers to continue their ascent into the unknown." (Finis Dunaway)
  • Fotografie zeigt ein Häufchen des radioaktiv verseuchten Erdbodens im Wald von Fukushima. Bei dem Fotopapier, auf dem die Fotografie erscheint, handelt es sich um ein kleines Stück des größeren Fotopapiers, das auf der Aufnahme zu sehen ist. Es ist radioaktiv verstrahlt. Aufgezeigt werden „die toxischen Verstrickungen zwischen einem Tsunami, einer Atomexplosion und einem irreversibel verseuchten Gebiet, die sowohl auf eine Naturkatastrophe als auch auf menschliches Handeln zurückzuführen sind.“